Descartes Views on God Essay Example for Free

In his Letter to the Sorbonne published at the beginning of his seminal work, Meditations on First Philosophy. Descartes states that his purpose in showing that the human mind or soul is really distinct from the body is to refute those “irreligious people” who only have faith in mathematics and will not believe in the soul's immortality without a mathematical demonstration of it. Descartes goes on to explain how, because of this, these people will not pursue moral virtue without the prospect of an afterlife with rewards for virtue and punishments for vice. But, since all the arguments in the Meditations —including the real distinction arguments— are for Descartes absolutely certain on a par with geometrical demonstrations, he believes that these people will be obliged to accept them. Hence, irreligious people will be forced to believe in the prospect of an afterlife. However, recall that Descartes’ conclusion is only that the mind or soul can exist without the body. He stops short of demonstrating that the soul is actually immortal. Indeed, in the Synopsis to the Mediations. Descartes claims only to have shown that the decay of the body does not logically or metaphysically imply the destruction of the mind: further argumentation is required for the conclusion that the mind actually survives the body's destruction. This would involve both “an account of the whole of physics” and an argument showing that God cannot annihilate the mind. Yet, even though the real distinction argument does not go this far, it does, according to Descartes, provide a sufficient foundation for religion, since the hope for an afterlife now has a rational basis and is no longer a mere article of faith.

Descartes, arguments for existence of God | Idea | …

What are two arguments Descartes gives for the existence of God

Descartes Proof for the Existence of God Essay

I have argued that existence should not properly be seen as a perfection, rather, existence is a prerequisite of any being who is then capable of being either perfect or imperfect. Further, Descartes's argument builds into his premises the conclusion that he is trying to demonstrate, namely that a most-perfect being must exist in order to be a most-perfect being. Last, predicating the existence of God as a divine attribute seems to be unhelpful in addressing His actual existence. Descartes needs to arrive at God's existence through empirical means that do not rely on a restatement of the problem in the form "if then " as a solution to God's actual existence.

Essay on Descartes Arguments For The Existence Of God

EssayIn my life on this planet I have come to question many things that many take on as forces working inside ourselves which want to search out the true outcome of what Finally, I will point to some complications and problems that exist within his proof Descartes proof of the existence of God occurs in the Third MeditationChristine WyrtzenWhat does a hundred-fold harvest look like as it s growing?

Free Sample Essay on Descartes Arguments For The Existence Of God
Is Descartes' argument in the Fifth Meditation for the existence of God sound

Descartes, Rene | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

EssayIn my life on this planet I have come to question many things that many take on as forces working inside ourselves which want to search out the true outcome of what Finally, I will point to some complications and problems that exist within his proof Descartes proof of the existence of God occurs in the Third Meditation

Descartes' ontological argument, for those who may be unfamiliar, is one of his proofs for the existence of God

René Descartes - Wikipedia

Descartes wishes to argue that existence is a perfection and hence it belongs to those characteristics of the divine nature. However, a thing cannot possess a characteristic unless it first exists. In his reply to Descartes's argument, Gassendi complains that "that which does not exist has neither perfection nor imperfection, and that which exists has various perfections" (Plantinga 46). Existence, therefore, should more properly be thought of as a prerequisite for perfection and not a perfection in and of itself. Descartes disagrees however, and in his reply to Gassendi he argues that existence is necessarily predicated of God because existence is a part of the true essence of any perfect being (Plantinga 49). For Descartes, it is not possible for us to possess the idea of a most perfect being if this being lacks the most important characteristic of existence. If God did not exist then He would not be the most perfect being, but we clearly have the idea of the most perfect being so therefore He must exist. The problem with this notion, however, is that Descartes begs the question by building into premise (2) the concept of a perfect being which has yet to be demonstrated. In order to demonstrate God's existence, Descartes should not assume, or presuppose, that which he is attempting to conclude. But by predicating the existence of God in (2) he has already concluded that which is later restated in the conclusion. In effect, the follower of Descartes's argument is tricked, for if he or she agrees with the foundational premises for the sake of the argument (that existence is predicated of a most perfect being), then there is no choice left but to conclude that God exists.

Descartes Proof for the Existence of God Essay example 1562 Words | 7 Pages. From that single observation he deduces a rule that he will build his entire argument upon.

Study Guide to Descartes' Meditations: Part II - …

D10. Descartes's ontological argument in the Fifth Meditation
Where does Descartes get the idea for his ontological argument? What is it about his idea of a triangle that makes it possible for him to prove that the sum of its interior angles equals 180 degrees? How does the idea of a unicorn differ from the idea of a triangle? How cogent are mathematical demonstrations (proofs)? Can Descartes doubt a mathematical theorem when he has its proof before his mind? Formulate his ontological proof of the existence of God. How cogent is it? Why then does Descartes hesitate to accept its conclusion as an indubitable and certain truth? Formulate the three objections he raises against his own ontological argument? How does he answer these objections? Does he now give his full assent to his ontological argument and its conclusion?>